They've been trying hard, haven't they? The Present perfect progressive tense shows action that has been continuously happening up to the present moment. Subject + has / have + not + been + Progresisve Participle. The table below provides an overview of conjugations of the present perfect progressive in positive, negative and interrogative sentences. ??? Therefore, we need to use the past participle of ‘to be’ which is ‘been’. They've been married for nearly fifty years. The present perfect progressive tense combines the form The final consonant is doubled in words that have a short stressed vowel before the final consonant. Have you been working hard? The negative forms may also be contracted: Finally, questions are also formed as in the present perfect: I've been feeling tired. to express repeated actions that started in the past and continue now. The present perfect tense can be simple or progressive. She's been working ???. Remember that some verbs cannot be used in progressive tenses. ??? For example: What has she been doing? The present perfect progressive is conjugated with the present form of have, the past participle of be and the present participle or -ing form of the … Make sure to conjugate ‘to have’ to agree with the subject. However, the focus is always on the continuity of the action at a given moment. The present perfect is formed from the present tense of the verb have and the past participle of a verb.. We use the present perfect: for something that started in the past and continues in the present:. !! It's been raining a lot. in both form and meaning / usage. ---> We use the Present Perfect Continuous Tense to describe an action that began in the past progress and may also continue in the future. Aaron has been repairing cars since he was sixteen years old. The signal words for the present perfect progressive are: To conjugate the present perfect progressive we follow the rule: have/has + been + verb in the -ing form. They haven't (they've not) been trying hard, have they? ---> people have been trying to contact him. Present Perfect Progressive combines the perfect and the progressive aspect. The present perfect continuous tense (sometimes called the present perfect progressive tense) is formed by using the present tense of the auxiliary verb have (or has, if used with third-person singular pronouns) along with been (the past participle of the auxiliary verb be) and the present participle ( -ing form) of the “main” verb. In the exercises, you can practise what you have learnt. has / have. Advertise with ESL Cafe Now. _________________________________________. However, there are a few exceptions to this rule: Contractions are a combination of certain pronouns, verbs and the word not. To express the perfect aspect, we need the auxiliary verb ‘to have’ and to express progression, we need the auxiliary verb ‘to be’. Here are the three main uses of the present perfect continuous: Take a closer look at the difference between the present perfect and the present perfect progressive in English grammar in the tense comparison section of the website. ‘Been’ is followed by the progressive participle (-ing form) of the actual action verb as in case of all progressive tenses. To make sure that you understand the correct answers, our answer keys offer simple explanations as well as handy tips and tricks. As in the present perfect, the subject + have / has is ---> The timing of this action is not specified, instead, the result or process of the action is emphasised. The present perfect continuous verb tense, also known as the present perfect progressive, is used to describe an action that first started in the past and is still happening in the present, or is still relevant to other events happening in the present. ---> Present Perfect Progressive combines the perfect and the progressive aspect. This is how these forms are combined: subject. The typical adverbs of the Present Perfect Progressive Tense are mostly the same with the typical adverbs of the Present Perfect Tense. For exercises visit the Present Perfect Progressive … 1. The present perfect continuous tense (also known as the present perfect progressive tense) shows that something started in the past and is continuing at the present time. She has lived in Liverpool all her life.. when we are talking about our experience up to the present: The PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates a continuous action that has been finished at some point in the past or that was initiated in the past and continues to happen.